The Impact of Race/Ethnicity on Treatment Outcomes in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

The Impact of Race/Ethnicity on Treatment Outcomes in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

The results of a recent retrospective cohort study revealed that among patients with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) who underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy, there was a noticeable difference in the odds of achieving pathologic complete response (pCR) based on race/ethnicity. The study, conducted by Maggie L. DiNome, MD, and colleagues at Duke University School of Medicine, found that Black women with TNBC were less likely to achieve pCR compared to white women (OR 0.89, 95% CI 0.83-0.95, P=0.001). On the other hand, Hispanic women showed an increased likelihood of achieving pCR (OR 1.19, 95% CI 1.08-1.31, P=0.001).

The study also examined the overall survival (OS) rates among patients with TNBC and found that those who achieved pCR had significantly higher unadjusted OS compared to those with residual disease (5-year OS, 0.917 vs 0.667, log-rank P

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